Book Review: Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World by Meredith Broussard

In Artificial Unintelligence: How Computers Misunderstand the World, Meredith Broussard adds to the growing literature exploring the limits of artificial intelligence (AI) and techno-solutionism, furthermore showing how its socially-constructed nature replicates existing structural inequalities. Calling for greater racial and gender diversity in tech, the book offers a timely, accessible and often entertaining account that sets the record straight on what current approaches to […]

How diverse is your reading list? (Probably not very…)

The dominance of scholars from the global North is widespread, and this extends to the student curriculum. Data on reading lists shows large authorial imbalances, which has consequences for the methodological tools available in research and allows dominant paradigms in disciplines to remain unchallenged. This post originally appeared on the Citing Africa Blog and is accompanied by a series of podcasts on […]

Don’t let your academic career determine your every move – Should early career researchers be expected to relocate regularly in order to land a permanent job?

To secure a permanent academic position, it has become an increasingly common requirement for early career researchers to work in a number of institutions, often across a number of countries. In this post, Eva Krockow weighs the benefits of an international career against the costs of constant mobility and suggests that fostering more stable working environments will ultimately prove beneficial […]

CIDR project “The Chinese Deathscape” is published by Stanford University Press

Chinese Deathscape cover

March 20, 2019

by Glen Worthey

The Stanford Libraries’ Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR) is proud to share in the announcement of a new publication, by the Stanford University Press, of The Chinese Deathscape: Grave Reform in Modern China, a longstanding collaboration led the publication’s editor, Professor Thomas S. Mullaney of the Department of History, and featuring custom design and software development primarily by former CIDR developer David McClure.

This publication is the latest in SU Press’s Digital Scholarship series of interactive scholarly works, and the first fully peer-reviewed and professionally published of CIDR’s many projects in the digital humanities and computational social sciences.

“If you use social media then you are not working” – How do social scientists perceive altmetrics and online forms of scholarly communication?

Altmetrics – web-based measures of research usage – have existed for a decade. However, a significant proportion of social science research fails to register any online attention at all. This impairs the usefulness of altmetrics as a tool to understand the relevance of social science research and also suggests social researchers are less inclined to engage in online arenas. In […]