The problem with accessibility checklists

Accessibility checklists are increasingly becoming offered as ways to improve inclusivity in Higher Education. However, they rely on the presumption that those delivering education and thus using them have no accessibility needs of their own. Moreover, in seeking to codify what counts as inclusivity, many students’ requirements get overlooked. In this post, Dr Kelsie Acton … Continued

Dryad & Frictionless Data

Guided by our commitment to make research data publishing more seamless and also re-usable, we are thrilled to partner with Open Knowledge Foundation and the Frictionless Data team to enhance our submission processes. Integrating the Frictionless Data toolkit, Dryad will … Continue reading

Should supervisors be training PhD students to achieve impact?

In addition to thesis writing, PhD candidates in SHAPE subjects are expected to be able to communicate their research to diverse audiences and also be prepared for careers outside of Higher Education. Should PhD supervision cover these areas, or does impact training sit more naturally elsewhere in the university ecosystem? In this post, Katherine Parker-Hay, … Continued

The Computing Cultural Heritage Collections Project is Looking for Researchers!

Do you work with digital collections as data in your research? Apply for a contract to work with Library of Congress data in the cloud as part of the Computing Cultural Heritage Collections project. Researchers will help the Library build a rich understanding of the uses for large scale computational access to library collections, including […]

The need for open data sharing in the era of global pandemics

Since the start of the pandemic, data on different countries’ case counts has been readily available. However, not all data is equally useful. In this post, Bernardo Gutierrez and Sabrina Li, from the Open COVID-19 Data Working Group and the Oxford Martin School, outline the need for much more detailed, open and accessible sharing to … Continued

Dime novels digitization collaboration launches

"Always On Duty; or, The Life of a New York Fireman" - Cover of Brave and Bold Weekly

November 16, 2020

by Hannah Frost

This month Stanford Libraries is launching a collaborative project to expand access to our extensive holdings of American dime novels from the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  Dime novels, which flourished in the United States in the second half of the 19th century and the early 20th century, featured an ever-evolving array of popular fiction genres: frontier stories modeled on the work of James Fenimore Cooper, detective stories, westerns, romances, sports stories. Widely read in their day, dime novels provided cheap fiction for an expanding reading public. Today, many dime novels are in particularly fragile condition due to the cheap nature of the paper used in their production, and collections are spread across the country with few institutions holding complete runs of major dime novel series.