Category: Twitter

Can Twitter data help in spotting problems early with publications? What retracted COVID-19 papers can teach us about science in the public sphere

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought science into mainstream public and political debates in novel ways, notably through the widespread use of social media to share and discuss new findings. In this post, Robin Haunschild and Lutz Bornmann discuss their r…

“Why I’ve deleted my Twitter account #exhaustionrebellion” ~ by Mark Carrigan

After close to a decade of using twitter as an academic, Mark Carrigan reflects on why he has decided to leave the platform. Highlighting, the benefits of twitter, but also the increasingly institutionalised nature of academic social media and the way in which social media work has become a required, but unrecognised feature of academic labour, he suggests that twitter has […]

Do social media companies undervalue the expertise of online communities?

Type vaccines into twitter and under a new initiative you will be prompted towards information supplied by expert institutions such as the NHS or US Department of Health and Human Services. However, by directing audiences to these sources, do social media companies overlook the important role played by online communities of lay experts? In this post Stefania Vicari explores how […]

Building online personas: Has social media become an exercise in self-branding?

In this post, Gal Oestreicher-Singer, Hilah Geva,  and Maytal Saar-Tsechansky, discuss the extent to which users of twitter use the platform in order to diversify their identities, or to maintain ‘on message’ branded identities. Presenting a novel methodology, their findings suggest that twitter has become a tool for targeted self promotion, behaviour that is especially prevalent in professional bloggers. More than 20 […]

Nothing lasts forever: questions to ask yourself when choosing a new tool or technology for research

Academia has become increasingly reliant on third-party tools and technologies to carry out many of the processes throughout the research lifecycle. But there are genuine concerns about the sustainability of some of these tools and what the implications would be for users in the event they were discontinued. Andy Tattersall suggests a series of straightforward questions researchers should ask themselves […]