Category: Research policy

Simplifying Responsible Research and Innovation – A tool building in societal readiness into research

Researchers and research funders are increasingly seeking to ensure their work is aligned to societal needs and to prevent it from having foreseeable negative impacts, particularly in fast moving and ethically sensitive fields. In this post, Stefan de …

War in Ukraine highlights the enduring myths of science diplomacy.

Amongst other things, the war in Ukraine has demonstrated the failure of western diplomacy to contain the outbreak of war in Europe. Over the past decades, one aspect of this diplomacy has involved the role of scientific and research relationships betw…

Do research priorities for mental health actually reflect the goal of fostering well-being?

Mental health research is a complex and inherently social field of research that cuts across traditional academic disciplines as varied as biomedical science and education studies. In this post, Wouter van de Klippe, Alfredo Yegros, Tim Willemse and Is…

We live in an age of projects – Research impact should reflect this

In the second of two blogposts exploring how research impact is increasingly dependent on expertise embedded within organisations rather than traditional research outputs, Rebecca Vine and Paul Nightingale discuss the role of projects as a focus for co…

Plan S has fundamentally re-shaped academic publishing: As we emerge from the pandemic it should not return to how it was before.

Taking stock of what Plan S – a funder led initiative to deliver widespread open access to research – has achieved since its conception and launch in 2018, Rachael Pells and Robert-Jan Smits discuss their new book “Plan S for Shock”. In mak…

By focusing on outputs, rather than people, we misunderstand the real impact of research.

Arguing that science policy remains shaped by enduring ideas of linear knowledge transfer from research to society, Paul Nightingale and Rebecca Vine, propose that research impact in contemporary service economies lies predominantly within the applicat…

Without a clear sense of purpose, what is the future of national research assessment exercises in Australia?

Commenting on the recent review of Australia’s ERA and EIA research assessment exercises, Ksenia Sawczak argues that they lack a clearly defined purpose, or return on investment for Australian universities. In a climate of declining trust in the Austra…