Category: Research Ethics

How common is academic plagiarism?

Drawing on insights from a recent international survey on research integrity and a recent high-profile case, Nick Allum and Robin Brooker find previous work on scientific plagiarism may have underestimated its prevalence. The resignation of Claudine Ga…

If journals are to be purged of racist and sexist work, who decides where to draw the line?

Following the resignation of Harvard president Claudine Gay over allegations of plagiarism, questions around research integrity and the integrity of the scholarly record have come to the fore. Till Bruckner argues that loose definitions of research int…

The weaponisation of forensic research auditing will not resolve systemic research misconduct

Commenting on the trend for the politically motivated forensic scrutiny of the research records of academics, Till Bruckner argues that singling out individuals in this way has a chilling effect on academic freedom and distracts from efforts to address…

Responsible social science – Why business research should focus beyond the scale of the firm

Responsible research strives for useful, credible knowledge relevant to addressing societal and planetary challenges. But what does this mean? Can researchers identify questions that are, at the same time, of relevance for society and publishable in th…

The persistence of eugenics in mainstream journals highlights major gaps in research integrity

When published, bad data can have long lasting negative impacts on research and the wider world. In this post Rebecca Sear, traces the impact of the national IQ dataset and reflects how its continued use in research highlights the lack of priority give…

How to navigate the challenges of corporate-academia research partnerships

Many research projects draw on sources of funding from the corporate world. Fola Adeleke discusses the challenges inherent to this kind of research and outlines three key considerations for researchers engaging with corporate partners.   Corporate-acad…

The gap between AI practitioners and ethics is widening – it doesn’t need to be this way

The application of AI technologies to social issues and the need for new regulatory frameworks is a major global issue. Drawing on a recent survey of practitioner attitudes towards regulation, Marie Oldfield discusses the challenges of implementing eth…

Double-anonymous review is an effective way of combating status bias in scholarly publishing 

Discussions around improving peer review often focus on openness as a mechanism to reduce bias. Drawing on a recent study of double and single anonymisation at the British Ecological Society, Charles Fox argues for the benefits of double anonymisation …

Making retraction data freely accessible – Why Crossref’s acquisition of the Retraction Watch database is a big step forward

Since its launch Retraction Watch has done much to highlight the value of research integrity and publishing standards. Discussing the recent acquisition by Crossref of Retraction Watch’s database of retracted articles, Ivan Oransky and Rachael Lammey h…

The benefits of Open science are not inevitable: monitoring its development should be value-led

Open science is increasingly becoming a policy focus and paradigm for all scientific research. Ismael Rafols, Ingeborg Meijer and Jordi Molas-Gallart argue that attempts to monitor the transition to open science should be informed by the values underpi…