Category: policy

UC Open Access: How to Comply

My last two blog posts have been about the new open access policy that applies to the entire University of California system. For big open science nerds like myself, this is exciting progress and deserves much ado. For the on-the-ground researcher at a UC, knee-deep in grants and lecture preparation, the ado could probably be […]

A Closer Look at the New UC Open Access Policy

Last week, the University of California announced a new Open Access Policy. Here I will explore the policy in a bit more detail.  The gist of the policy is this: research articles authored by UC faculty will be made available to the public at no charge. I’m sure most of this blog’s readers are familiar […]

UC Faculty Senate Passes #OA Policy

Big news! I just got this email regarding the new Open Access Policy for the University of California System. I’ll write a full blog post next week but wanted to share this as soon as possible. (emphasis is mine) The Academic Senate of the University of California has passed an Open Access Policy, ensuring that […]

It’s Time for Better Project Metrics

I’m involved in lots of projects, based at many institutions, with multiple funders and oodles of people involved. Each of these projects has requirements for reporting metrics that are used to prove the project is successful. Here, I want to argue that many of these metrics are arbitrary, and in some cases misleading. I’m not […]

Setting Out on the Digital Preservation Path as a Library of Congress Junior Fellow

This is a guest post by Madeline Sheldon, a 2013 Junior Fellow working with NDIIPP. I am currently working towards a Master of Science in Information from the University of Michigan School of Information, with a specialization in Library and Information Science. In the past, I held library positions, which included working in reference services, […]

Closed Data… Excuses, Excuses

If you are a fan of data sharing, open data, open science, and generally openness in research, you’ve heard them all: excuses for keeping data out of the public domain. If you are NOT a fan of openness, you should be. For both groups (the fans and the haters), I’ve decided to construct a “Frankenstein monster” […]

The New OSTP Policy & What it Means

Last week, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) responded to calls for broader access to federally funded research. I was curious as to whether this policy had any teeth, so I actually read the official memorandum. Here I summarize and have a few thoughts. The overall theme of the document is best […]

Using long-term data sets to trace the impacts of environmental policy

Salmon Pond in Maine, one of the bodies of water from our study.

Just before I became a staff scientist at NEON, I and colleagues from the University of Colorado, Environmental Protection Agency, and University of Maine took a new a look at some long-term data to help answer a question that has been perplexing scientists for several decades: Why is the amount of dissolved organic matter (the stuff that gives water that brownish-yellowish tint) increasing in lakes and streams of the northeastern United States and Europe? Our study contributed to growing evidence suggesting that it’s a symptom of recovery from acid rain.…