Category: open access

What happens when you make a book open access? New business models are emerging, but challenges still remain.

Initial studies into the effect of open access monographs suggest little to no impact on sales, but an increase in discoverability and online usage. But there are still many hurdles to overcome before OA books become a routine option for … Continue reading

Recomposing Scholarship: The critical ingredients for a more inclusive scholarly communication system.

Scholarship is not just about publication, but about interaction, interpretation, exchange, deliberation, discourse, debate, and controversy. Below is the transcript from Jonathan Gray‘s talk at yesterday’s conference which outlined how at odds the current system of academic publishing, commodification and reward is … Continue reading

Browse the entire eCollection: Open Access Perspectives in the Humanities and Social Sciences

Yesterday we co-hosted the event Open Access Futures in the Humanities and Social Sciences. The aim of the conference was to bring together a diverse range of voices within the wider community to examine and interrogate issues of openness, new horizons … Continue reading

Driven by user input and discipline-specific aims, PhilPapers combines access with engagement.

Having begun as an online categorisation service for philosophy students and teachers, PhilPapers has grown to be an established open access archive and active forum for research engagement. Justin Bzovy and Emma Ryman show that PhilPapers is a vibrant example … Continue reading

Data sharing not only helps facilitate the process of psychology research, it is also a reflection of rigour.

Although many psychologists acknowledge the usefulness of storing and sharing their data, studies suggest this is not a common practice. Secrecy can lead to all sorts of problems including biases in reporting of results, honest errors, and even fraud. Jelte Wicherts believes it … Continue reading

Open access initiatives in the Global South affirm the lasting value of a shared scholarly communications system.

Developing countries stand to benefit greatly from a more open and equitable international scholarly communication system, but Dominique Babini argues new commercial enclosures to access are also emerging. The international community would do well to follow the examples of initiatives in Latin America, … Continue reading

Open access legislation in the US and Canada looks to prioritise post-publication archiving, not publishers’ profits.

Providing further context on open access policy, Heather Morrison presents cases from the U.S. and Canada, where each are also grappling with how to provide wider access to publicly funded research. If passed, the U.S.’s FASTR Act would require ‘green’ … Continue reading

As the European Commission paves the way for open access, a consistent policy environment is needed across the EU.

The European Commission has extended and solidified its open access policy for the upcoming Horizon 2020 research funding programme. Alma Swan welcomes the clear signal from Brussels which has issued a Recommendation for Member States to follow its lead. But … Continue reading

Top-down mandates and advocacy will help institutional repositories continue to enhance open access content and delivery.

Institutional repositories (IRs) can sometimes be perceived as a low-impact method of open access delivery. Neil Stewart explains how the rapidly changing scholarly communications ecosystem stands to greatly benefit from the continued development of repositories. The future of IRs looks … Continue reading