Category: open access

Open Access and the enduring myths of the long 1990s

From the dawn of the popular internet in the 1990s to the present day, Open Access (OA) to scholarly research has been a goal for many researchers and advocates. Drawing on research into the early OA discourse of the 1990s, Corina MacDonald argues that…

The APC question mark hovering over the OSTP announcement

The recent announcement by the U.S. Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) set out a requirement for all federally funded research to be made immediately publicly accessible and in so doing has significantly accelerated a transition to Open Acc…

Collaborations with Embedded Audio Metadata: Reusing Cue Chunk Data for IIIF Web Annotations

Collaborative editing and preservation capabilities enabled by an emerging open source workflow and updated preservation guidelines? More on a pilot of annotation approaches with AudioAnnotate Audiovisual Extensible Workflow, FADGI and BWF MetaEdit, and American Folklife Center collections in this post.

The Human Rights Case for Open Science

You’re writing a grant application, and you want to make a strong case for open science! You’ve seen colleagues use language from human rights treaties to support their arguments for open work in the past: but what does that actually mean? Does interna…

Article Processing Charges (APCs) and the new enclosure of research

Drawing on a recent analysis of APC pricing and movements within the commercial publishing sector, Gunnar Sivertsen and Lin Zhang argue that APCs have now firmly established themselves as the predominant business model for academic publishing. Highligh…

Open access books: A global preference for regional subjects

For many research disciplines English functions as the global language for research. But, how far does this align with patterns of research use globally? Drawing on download evidence from the OAPEN library of open access books, Ronald Snijder explores …

Changing the gender narrative with open access

Academic success is regularly framed in terms of a particular set of publishing activities that disadvantages women. In this post, Katie Wilson and Lucy Montgomery discuss their recent research into how women researchers have pioneered the use of open …

Three false starts on the road to open social science

The shift to ‘open’ working across the social sciences as a discipline group entails a welcome but demanding cultural change. Yet, Patrick Dunleavy argues that there have already been three false starts: focusing only on isolated bits of the open agend…

What do researchers think about paying to publish open access – Findings from a global survey

Through different mechanisms pay to publish models have been established globally as one of the key routes to the open access publication of academic research. This model has introduced new kinds of inequalities into scholarly communication, but to wha…