Category: LSE Comment

Who should take responsibility for integrity in research?

Reflecting on comparisons with the US and the results of the recent International Research Integrity Survey (IRIS), George Gaskell, Nick Allum, Miriam Bidoglia and Abigail-Kate Reid argue that robust research integrity cultures depend on support from d…

From research to the mainstream – Judging the British Academy Book Prize for Global Cultural Understanding

As nominations for this year’s prize open, Madawi Al-Rasheed reflects on the experience of judging the British Academy Book Prize for Global Cultural Understanding and considers how research based non-fiction writing can reach beyond local and discipli…

Food Sovereignty as a model for scholar-led open access publishing

As large commercial publishers adapt their business models to profit from an increasingly open access (OA) scholarly publishing landscape, there has been an increased focus on alternate scholar-led and diamond forms of open access. Andrea E. Pia and Fi…

In legislating for freedom of speech on university campuses, whose opinions will the government protect?

The Higher Education and Freedom of Speech Bill is currently moving through the committee stage in Parliament. In this post, Conor Gearty reflects on previous attempts to regulate free speech in universities and highlights potential unintended conseque…

Have you written for an LSE Blog? Let us know what you think.

Have you written for an LSE Blog before? Whether it is the LSE Impact, British Politics and Policy, LSE Review of Books, or any of our 60 plus blogs? We would like to know what you think. The survey takes around 10 minutes to complete and the aim is to…

Podcast: Do algorithms have too much social power?

The latest episode episode of the LSE IQ podcast asks do algorithms have too much power? From the way your phone’s autocorrect adjusts your messages, to making life and death decisions on the battlefield, algorithms already play a significant rol…

Podcast: Do algorithms have too much social power?

The latest episode episode of the LSE IQ podcast asks do algorithms have too much power? From the way your phone’s autocorrect adjusts your messages, to making life and death decisions on the battlefield, algorithms already play a significant rol…

Working with serendipity to produce impact

Impact does not always arise as a primary objective of research. Naomi Pendle, who has been researching South Sudan’s local justice system for a decade, has had a significant impact on the World Food Programme’s warning systems for famine in the countr…

The impacts agenda is an autonomous push for opening up and democratizing academia, not part of a neo-liberal hegemony

Improving academic impact has been given a bad name in some academic circles, who link it to a near-conspiracy theory view of the powers of ‘neo-liberalism’. But Patrick Dunleavy and Jane Tinkler argue that (despite one or two bureaucratic distortions, like the REF), the impacts agenda is centrally about enhancing the efficacy of scientific and … Continued