Category: Evidence-based Policy

A greater proportion of social science graduates are employed shortly after leaving university than STEM or arts graduates.

Roses Leech-Wilkinson presents the findings from a recent report which underlines the strong career prospects of social science graduates. This data does well to challenge some negative stereotypes on the usefulness of social science disciplines, but falling student numbers could already be … Continue reading

A replicated study on nuclear proliferation shows the critical necessity of reviewing accepted scientific results.

In replicating a 2009 study on the role of asymmetric nuclear weapons possession, Mark Bell and Nicholas Miller found that a computational error led to the overestimation of the deterrent effect of nuclear weapons by a factor of several million. It is … Continue reading

Impact-monitoring research leads to clear EU policy recommendations to improve services for children of prisoners.

In England and Wales there are an estimated 200,000 children with a parent in prison, and on any given day, an estimated 800,000 children have a parent in prison in the European Union. The COPING team argue that this area … Continue reading

There is sufficient evidence to suggest Whitehall is leaning on researchers to produce politically useful research.

The quality of scientific evidence in government heavily depends upon the independent assessment of research. Pressure from those commissioning the research may pose a threat to scientific integrity and rigorous policy-making. Edward Page reports that whilst there is strong evidence of government leaning, … Continue reading