Category: Data availability

How do researchers pay for data publishing? Results of a recent submitter survey

As a non-profit repository dependent on support from members and users, Dryad is greatly concerned with the economics and sustainability of data services. Our business model is built around Data Publishing Charges (DPCs), designed to recover the basic costs of curating and preserving data. Dryad DPCs can be covered in 3 ways: The DPC is waived if the […]

Researcher Profile: Zach Gompert

We’re beginning a series highlighting researchers who use Dryad to openly publish their research data. We ask them about their current projects, why they believe in open science, and why they choose Dryad. For our first researcher profile, we talked with Dr. Zach Gompert, assistant professor in the Department of Biology at Utah State University, […]

A month of open

We’re coming off of a big month which included a two-day Dryad board meeting, International Data Week in Denver, and the Open Access Publishers meeting (COASP) in Arlington, VA. Combined with Open Access Week, we’ve been basking in all things #openscience at Dryad. International Data Week 2016 International Data Week was a collection of three different events: SciDataCon 2016, International Data Forum, and the […]

Making open data useful: A drug safety case study

We’re pleased to present a guest post from data scientist Juan M. Banda, the lead author of an important, newly-available resource for drug safety research. Here, Juan shares some of the context behind the data descriptor in Scientific Data and associated data package in Dryad. – EH _____ As I sit in a room full of over […]

Dryad’s first virtual community meeting: members share their expertise

On May 24, we held the first virtual Dryad Community Meeting, which allowed us to connect both with our membership and with the larger open data community, far and wide. The theme was “Leadership in data publishing: Dryad and learned societies.” Following an introduction and update about Dryad from yours truly, we heard about the experiences from representatives of three of Dryad’s […]

Sci-Hub stories: Digging into the downloads

The following is a guest post from science journalist John Bohannon. We asked him to give us some background on his recent dataset in Dryad and the analysis of that data in Science. What stories will you find in the data? – EH _______ Sci-Hub is the world’s largest repository of pirated journal articles. We will probably […]

2015 stats roundup

While gearing up for the Dryad member meeting (to be held virtually on 24 May – save the date!) and publication of our annual report, we’re taking a look at last year’s numbers. 2015 was a “big” year for Dryad in many respects. We added staff, and integrated several new journals and publishing partners. But […]

New partnership with The Company of Biologists

We are delighted to announce the launch of a new partnership with The Company of Biologists to support their authors in making the data underlying their research available to the community. The Company of Biologists is a not-for-profit publishing organization dedicated to supporting and inspiring the biological community. The Company publishes five specialist peer-reviewed journals: Development Journal […]

A snapshot of life on the savannah

Our latest featured data package is from Alexandra Swanson and colleagues at the Snapshot Serengeti project, and accompanies their peer-reviewed article in Scientific Data.  It provides a unique resource for studying the one of the world’s most extraordinary mammal assemblages and also for studies of computer vision and machine learning. In addition, data from Snapshot Serengeti is already being used in biology and computer science classrooms to enable […]

What were the most downloaded data packages in 2014?

The reason why Dryad is in the business of archiving, preserving, and providing access to research data is so that it will be reused, whether for deeper reading of the publication, for post-publication review, for education, or for future research. While it’s not yet as easy as we would like to track data reuse, one metric that is straightforward […]