Category: Bibliodiversity

Global Language Justice – review

In Global Language Justice, Lydia H. Liu and Anupama Rao bring together contributions at the intersection of language, justice and technology, exploring topics including ecolinguistics, colonial legacies and the threat digitisation poses to marginalise…

Open access works – 420 million citations show OA outputs are cited by more researchers from more places

Open access is built on the promise that more people are able to access and use research. Putting this to the test, Chun-Kai (Karl) Huang, Cameron Neylon and Lucy Montgomery explore where citations come from for 19 million research outputs and find tha…

What the UGC-CARE initiative tells us about Humanities and Social Science publishing in Indian languages

English is often claimed as the international language of research and academia. However, important bibliodiverse scholarly traditions exist across the globe. Shubhada Nagarkar describes the UGC-CARE project and how efforts to list and record social sc…

What the UGC-CARE initiative tells us about Humanities and Social Science publishing in Indian languages

English is often claimed as the international language of research and academia. However, important bibliodiverse scholarly traditions exist across the globe. Shubhada Nagarkar describes the UGC-CARE project and how efforts to list and record social sc…

Bridge or Barrier – Does generative AI contribute to more culturally inclusive higher education and research?

Whilst the ability of generative AI to produce text in English has been widely covered, the implications of its ability to translate and act as a cultural broker into English have received less attention. Considering use contexts in education and resea…

Beyond Web of Science and Scopus there is already an open bibliodiverse world of research – We ignore it at our peril

Discussing their analysis of a new dataset of journals published via the Open Journals Systems publishing platform, Saurabh Khanna, Jon Ball, Juan Pablo Alperin and John Willinsky  argue that rather than being an aspiration an open, regional and biblio…

Open access books: A global preference for regional subjects

For many research disciplines English functions as the global language for research. But, how far does this align with patterns of research use globally? Drawing on download evidence from the OAPEN library of open access books, Ronald Snijder explores …

Multilingualism is integral to accessibility and should be part of European research assessment reform

Developing research systems that promote diverse, multilingual and relevant research for different audiences is a key and often overlooked element in making research accessible. However, biases in traditional research assessment often place researchers…

Reading List: Neglected Cases in the Social Sciences

In Model Cases: On Canonical Research Objects and Sites, Monika Krause explores how scholars in the social sciences and humanities repeatedly draw on particular cases and research objects, shaping our understanding of more general ideas in disproportio…

Book Review: Political English: Language and the Decay of Politics by Thomas Docherty

In Political English: Language and the Decay of Politics, Thomas Docherty offers a new examination of the historical and contemporary linkages between power, politics and the English language, arguing that the impoverishment of language is intimately connected with the impoverishment of political debate today. The book demonstrates the concomitant decline of discourse and democracy and brings a new slant to … Continued