Category: Altmetrics

Four reasons to stop caring so much about the h-index.

The h-index attempts to measure the productivity and impact of the published work of scholar. But reducing scholarly work to a number in this way has significant limitations. Stacy Konkiel highlights four specific reasons the h-index fails to capture a complete picture of research impact. Furthermore, there are a variety of new altmetrics tools out there focusing on how to measure […]

With altmetrics on the rise, the education community can capture insights into how pedagogy research is being used.

The number of citations an article receives is often used as an indicator of impact but there are many instances where this metric fails to capture the wider results of how ideas are distributed. Adele Wolfson and Megan Brooks look particularly at … Continue reading

Researchers – get your ORCID

Yesterday I remotely joined a lab meeting at my old stomping grounds, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. My former advisor, Mike Neubert, asked me to join his math ecology lab meeting to “convince them to get ORCID Identifiers. (Or try anyway!)”. As a result, I’ve spent a little bit of time thinking about ORCIDs in the last few […]

Two Altmetrics Workshops in San Francisco

Last week, a group forward-thinking individuals interested in measuring scholarly impact gathered at Fort Mason in San Francisco to talk about altmetrics. The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation funded the events at Fort Mason, which included (1) an altmetrics-focused workshop run by the open-access publisher (and leader in ALM) PLOS, and (2) a NISO Alternative Assessment Initiative Project Workshop to discuss standards and […]

It’s Time for Better Project Metrics

I’m involved in lots of projects, based at many institutions, with multiple funders and oodles of people involved. Each of these projects has requirements for reporting metrics that are used to prove the project is successful. Here, I want to argue that many of these metrics are arbitrary, and in some cases misleading. I’m not […]