Category: #AcWri

Should you be highlighting that paper you’re reading?

The chances are at some point you have looked at a text you have been highlighting, digitally, or in the traditional fashion with a highlighter, and thought, what do these blocks of fluorescent colour actually mean? In this cross post, Pat Thomson disc…

Research Rituals – Finding the value of writing accountability groups

Academia, especially at PhD and Post-Doctoral level, is often associated with individual work and isolation. Reflecting on her experience of designing, facilitating, and working in writing accountability groups, Ann Gillian Chu discusses how to forge e…

What does it mean to “connect your work to an ongoing conversation”?

Placing your research within a wider academic discourse or ‘conversation’ is a standard requirement for academic writing, but what does it actually mean? In this cross-post, Pat Thomson, explores the concept and suggests that three principl…

A simple guide to ethical co-authorship

Historically the single authored paper has been a mainstay of social scientific and humanistic research writing. However, co-authorship is now for many social science disciplines the default mode of academic authorship. Reflecting on this, Helen Kara, …

Book Review: Mass Appeal: Communicating Policy Ideas in Multiple Media by Justin Gest

In Mass Appeal: Communicating Policy Ideas in Multiple Media, Justin Gest offers a guide for researchers who want to improve their ability to make a policy impact with their research, exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different media for communicating research ideas and their implications. This book is likely to be useful for researchers across the career spectrum, from … Continued

Writing fiction as scholarly work

Writing for academic publication is highly stylised and formalised. In this post Rob Kitchin describes how writing fiction has shaped his own academic praxis and can provide scholars with an expanded range of conceptual tools for communicating their research. “The usual approach to writing an academic article or book is to produce a factual, discursive narrative that … Continued

“But I’m not ready!” Common barriers to writing and how to overcome them

Writing a thesis can feel overwhelming. In this post, Hugh Kearns and Maria Gardiner are here to help. They detail the common reasons why PhD students tend to avoid writing and counter them with strategies to counter procrastination and perfectionism. Your thesis is probably the biggest writing task you will ever undertake. It can feel … Continued

How to run an academic writing retreat and bring the campus back together

Since it started in 2011, Academic Writing Month has seen a growth of workshops and initiatives aimed at helping researchers to prioritise writing projects.  In 2020, as many researchers are in lockdown and working from home, there are new challenges for concentrating on and completing writing. In this post, Andy Tattersall outlines his experience running online writing … Continued

Pitching your book in the COVID age: can academics stay relevant when the world is falling apart?

A pandemic has transformed the academic publishing industry. The way that books are commissioned and promoted has changed. So has what it takes to make a book relevant. In this post, publishing professional Katie Stileman outlines what angle and pitching strategies academics should consider, as they market their research in the COVID climate. This is … Continued