Category: academic writing

Should you be highlighting that paper you’re reading?

The chances are at some point you have looked at a text you have been highlighting, digitally, or in the traditional fashion with a highlighter, and thought, what do these blocks of fluorescent colour actually mean? In this cross post, Pat Thomson disc…

Research Rituals – Finding the value of writing accountability groups

Academia, especially at PhD and Post-Doctoral level, is often associated with individual work and isolation. Reflecting on her experience of designing, facilitating, and working in writing accountability groups, Ann Gillian Chu discusses how to forge e…

Lives change across academic careers – so should your writing habits

Are your writing habits the same as they were when you started your academic career? Are your lifestyle and responsibilities the same? In this post, Chris Smith explores how writing habits formed at the beginning of academic careers can be difficult to…

New AI tools that can write student essays require educators to rethink teaching and assessment

AI tools are available today that can write compelling university level essays. Taking an example of sample essay produced by the GPT-3 transformer, Mike Sharples discusses the implications of this technology for higher education and argues that they s…

5 Strategies for Hitting a Writing Deadline

To adapt the well-known saying: there are few constants in academia other than death and deadlines. Drawing on their experience as a writing coach and author, Delia Lloyd presents five strategies for getting writing done when you really need to. I was …

What does Open Science mean for disciplines where pen and paper are still the main working methods?

Open Science and its wider application to the social sciences and humanities, is predicated on the idea that research can be reproduced and shared across digital platforms, but to what extent do researchers actually use digital tools a part of their wo…

What does it mean to “connect your work to an ongoing conversation”?

Placing your research within a wider academic discourse or ‘conversation’ is a standard requirement for academic writing, but what does it actually mean? In this cross-post, Pat Thomson, explores the concept and suggests that three principl…

Keeping a research journal that works for you

Think of a research journal and you may imagine a well-thumbed notebook replete with insightful entries, answers to research questions and a chronicle of the key moments that led to this point. However, as Nicole Brown (author of Making the Most of You…