Category: Academic Publishing

Reflections on the rapid response roundtable

This is the eleventh post in a six-week series: Rapid or Rushed? exploring rapid response publishing in covid times. Read the rest of the series here. In this post, Helen Kara, editor of three rapid responses, reflects on the Impact blog’s virtual roundtable. Helen outlines key themes discussed: the role of rapid responses to topical and urgent events, the labour … Continued

Pitching your book in the COVID age: can academics stay relevant when the world is falling apart?

A pandemic has transformed the academic publishing industry. The way that books are commissioned and promoted has changed. So has what it takes to make a book relevant. In this post, publishing professional Katie Stileman outlines what angle and pitching strategies academics should consider, as they market their research in the COVID climate. This is … Continued

Academic Publishing in Nepal during the COVID-19 crisis

COVID-19 has transformed academic publishing, for books and journals. In this post Min Pun, shares his experiences as editor of two journals in Nepal. He outlines some of the opportunities posed by COVID-19, including the increased demand for research. However, there are also multiple barriers to the production and dissemination of knowledge in Nepal, including … Continued

How I wrote and published a book about the economics of coronavirus in a month

This post by roundtable panellist Joshua Gans was originally published in May by The Conversation This is the seventh post in a six-week series: Rapid or Rushed? exploring rapid response publishing in covid times. As part of the series, there will be a virtual roundtable on Friday 6th November, 1.30pm featuring Professor Joshua Gans (Economics in the Age of … Continued

The Pandemic Needs an Information Solution

This is the sixth post in a six-week series: Rapid or Rushed? exploring rapid response publishing in covid times. As part of the series, there will be a virtual roundtable on Friday 6th November, 1.30pm featuring Professor Joshua Gans (Economics in the Age of COVID-19, MIT Press) and Richard Horton (The COVID-19 Catastrophe, Polity Press and Editor of The … Continued

How the pandemic has transformed research methods and ethics: 3 lessons from 33 rapid responses

This is the fourth post in a six-week series: Rapid or Rushed? exploring rapid response publishing in covid times. As part of the series, there will be a virtual roundtable on Friday 6th November, 1.30pm featuring Professor Joshua Gans (Economics in the Age of COVID-19, MIT Press and Richard Horton (The COVID-19 Catastrophe, Polity Press and Editor of The … Continued

Open but Unfair- The role of social justice in Open Access publishing

Stage one of the Open Access (OA) movement promoted the democratization of scholarly knowledge, making work available so that anybody could read it. However, publication in highly ranked journals is becoming very costly, feeding the same vendor capitalists that OA was designed to sidestep. In this Q&A, Simon Batterbury argues that when prestige is valued … Continued

Open Science- Who is left behind?

Open Access initiatives promise to extend access to scholarly conversations. However, the dominant model of Article Processing Charges, whilst lowering financial barriers for readers, has merely erected a new paywall at the other end of the pipeline, blocking access to publication for less-privileged authors. In this post, Tony Ross-Hellauer, Angela Fessl, and Thomas Klebel, ask … Continued

Open Access is here to stay. But who will pay?

The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the already steady transition towards Open Access publishing. However, precisely what this future looks like and how it will be paid for by smaller, independent publishers is less clear. In this post, Danielle Padula outlines key findings from a report into the current state of Open Access among scholarly society and universities publishing … Continued

What we know about the academic journal landscape reflects global inequalities

Over the past sixty years, there has been an exponential growth in the global scholarly publishing landscape. Mapping or capturing it, however, is a difficult task as dominant databases only cover a small proportion of published journals. Kirsten Bell and David Mills offer their own cartographic visualisation of the global scholarly publishing landscape. They argue … Continued