Author: Bill LeFurgy

Anatomy of a Web Archive

The following is a guest post by Nicholas Taylor, Web Archiving Service Manager for Stanford University Libraries. I’m inclined to blame the semantic flexibility of the word “archive” for the fact that someone with no previous exposure to web archives might variously suppose that they are: the result of saving web pages from the browser, […]

71 Digital Portals to State History

A recent NDIIPP intern, Ingrid Jernudd, did some research into current web resources that provide digital access to a broad array of primary source materials at the state level. She prepared a list of sites that billed themselves as general-interest portals to historical resources. Although the list is likely incomplete, I was surprised she found […]

Libraries Need to Showcase Digital Special Collections

What’s so special about libraries? This is a  rhetorical question, as I think libraries are amazing places. But many are dead serious in posing the query these days. To this point the answer has been new services built on top of the tremendous reservoir of goodwill that libraries have accrued over the decades. But technology […]

Dear Husband: I’m So Sorry for Your Data Loss

This is a guest post by Abbie Grotke, Web Archiving Team Lead. We recently moved to a new house, and my husband, a professional musician, has been working on setting up a music and recording studio upstairs now that we have the room. Alongside the clarinets, saxophones and keyboard sit a desktop computer (with better […]

Bits Breaking Bad 2: The Atlas of Digital Damages, Revisited

Last October, I wrote about The Atlas of Digital Damages on Flickr. The idea was that it would be instructive to showcase digital content that suffered from problems roughly equivalent to physical content that was deteriorating due to mistakes or neglect. Since I last wrote about it, the atlas has acquired more examples reflecting all kinds of […]

Engaging Communities to Preserve: The History Harvest as a Collaboration Model for Digital Preservation

This is a guest post by Meghan Vance, a Public History graduate student at the University of Central Florida. As a Public History graduate student at the University of Central Florida, I had the unique opportunity to participate in an internship with E-Z Photo Scan, a member of the NDSA Outreach Group.  This internship evolved from a business-university […]

Rich Online Resources Document the 1963 March on Washington

A recent post from the Library of Congress’s main blog outlined some of the riches at the Library of Congress in connection with the 1963 March on Washington. Picture This, the blog for our Prints and Photographs Division also recently highlighted some recently digitized photographs from the march. In the spirit of the 50th anniversary, […]

The Digital Preservation Business Case Toolkit

This is a guest post by Paul Wheatley of the SPRUCE Project, which is “aiming to foster a vibrant and self-supporting community of digital preservation practitioners and developers via a mixture of online interaction and face to face events.” For more on SPRUCE, see an earlier interview with Paul. A significant proportion of the project I’m currently […]

Xporting Digital Format Sustainability Descriptions as XML

The following is a guest post by Carl Fleischhauer, a Digital Initiatives Project Manager in NDIIPP. In 2003, we began drafting descriptions of digital formats, intended to support the Library’s preservation planning. Knowing that our descriptions would be of general interest, and wishing to work cooperatively with emerging format registries (e.g., the Unified Digital Format […]

Analysis of Current Digital Preservation Policies: Archives, Libraries and Museums

The following is a guest post by Madeline Sheldon, a 2013 Junior Fellow with NDIIPP. My major project as a Library of Congress Junior Fellow was to identify and analyze cultural heritage institution digital preservation policies. This project was an update and extension of work done in 2011 by another Junior Fellow, Kristen Snawder. My full […]