Author: Amy E. Hodge

SDR Deposit of the Week: Disputed boundaries

It’s one thing to talk about an area of land under dispute, and it’s another thing entirely to see it on a map. Professor of Political Science Kenneth Schultz demonstrates the validity of this statement with his recent work, “Mapping Interstate Territorial Conflict,” which was published in December in the Journal of Conflict Resolution.

SDR Deposit of the Week: Facilitating reproducibility

Many scientists are making the reproducibility of their research a much higher priority these days than they used to. But it’s a time consuming task, which means that many are searching for tools and workflows to help facilitate their efforts.
Hatef Mo…

PURL pages get a new look!

Stanford Libraries’ persistent URL (PURL) pages are getting a new look!

The new pages have been designed to improve the way users interact with the content on PURL pages and to integrate these pages more seamlessly with the rest of Stanford Libraries’ web presence.

From the new embed viewer you can now obtain the html code required to embed this content on any web page — including your own personal web page or that of your lab or project.

SDR Deposit of the Week: Geology research will stand the test of time

Faculty retire, projects end, and the outputs of important research languish on forgotten hard drives and servers. It happens all the time. But retiring Professors Atilla Aydin and David Pollard wanted to be sure it didn’t happen to them. For 25 years they co-directed the Stanford Rock Fracture Project (RFP) in the Geology and Environmental Sciences Department, but they were concerned about the long-term availability of the research outputs of that project once they retired. 

Until they found out about the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR).

SDR Deposit of the Week: Researchers in the news

Researchers at Stanford are doing a lot of innovative and intriguing work. Their efforts are often highlighted in the Stanford Report, which provides readers with a brief compilation of the latest Stanford News via email each weekday. When those of us at Stanford Libraries who work on digital preservation read these articles, we immediately wonder what these researchers are doing to preserve all that wonderful research data.

Never ones to rest on our laurels, Stanford Libraries staff have been reaching out to these researchers and recommending that they preserve the data generated from these studies — and sometimes submitted to journals as supplementary data files — in the Stanford Digital Repository. We would hate to see all that innovative and intriguing work lost to the ravages of time!

SDR Deposit of the Week: Better processes for better chips

It only makes sense that if you were making solar cells or computer chips that you would choose the best materials for those tasks. It’s a no-brainer, right? The problem is that the best materials might be very expensive to use. 

Such has been the case with gallium arsenide, but this may be changing.

Bruce Clemens and Garrett Hayes have developed a new way of making chips from gallilum arsenide that brings down the cost considerably. They created a video that describes a new manufacturing process, and they have preserved that video in the Stanford Digital Repository for you to download and watch!

SDR Deposit of the Week: Reliability of Marine Structures

Construction of marine facilities is an expensive endeavor, with platforms built in deep waters costing in the billions of dollars. That makes it important to do it right the first time. Research at the John A. Blume Center for Earthquake Engineering h…

SDR Deposit of the Week: Get wind of this weather data

Weather is often a hot topic for discussion (no pun intended!), even here in the usually moderate Bay Area where thoughts on the current drought are frequently proffered. But our discussions of the weather would be baseless if it weren’t for weather da…

Happy Anniversary SDR!

December 13 is a momentous date in the history of the Stanford Digital Repository. It’s the date in 2012 when the very first research data item was deposited in the SDR through our online deposit application. Which makes Dec. 13, 2014, the second anniversary of this historic occasion!

Who was our first depositor, how did he find us, and what did he deposit?